sensory activities

Successful Mall Girl is Successful

Once upon a time, like last week, I went to the mall to do some shopping. 

(All of my SPD friends can get up off the floor now, as I’m certain all of you must have fallen out of your chairs with the sentence you just read).

But fear not, bloggy friends! Not only did I go to the mall, but I went BY MYSELF, and….

I LIVED TO BLOG ABOUT IT.

Is this a miracle? You could say that.

Is this a product of my fearless badassery and warrior-like approach to my entire life? Mostly.

Is this a freaky incident that I tried to savor as much as possible because it was so unbelievable. Yes.

 

Ladies and Gentlemen, it is time to recollect my astounding mall experience.

First, I had to make it through the parking lot. An SPD’er in a parking lot is usually a recipe for disaster. One horn, one beep – we are done. When I strolled through the lot, bracing myself against the painful NY coldness, I was like prey being hunted by my predator. Yet as I passed car after car, nothing happened. I hauled open the heavy doors of Dick’s Sporting Goods and threw myself inside. Awesomesauce, I thought.

Once inside, I tried to pretend like I was a very capable young woman on a shopping adventure. I also knew it was important for an SPD’er such as myself to review my body awareness – am I walking straight? Do I look like I’m dying? Do I appear as if I’m in need of psychiatric help? If YES, then it’s time to find the nearest exit. It’s a simple evaluation process:

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Luckily, I was fine. Everything checked out.

Being inside the mall is one thing, but then you must have to deal with the specific environment of each store WTIHIN the mall. I began my journey at the ever-sexy Victoria’s Secret.

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I was anxious. What if something happened inside? I was alone! Also, oh yea, I HAVE SPD.

Amazingly, the only bad thing that happened inside Victoria’s Secret was a shattered sense of self-esteem and general uncomfortableness.

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After Victoria’s Secret, I did everything that a good little SPD human was supposed to do. I avoided candle stores. I stayed away from the food court. I dodged screaming children. However, I did do something bad….

I WENT INTO HOT TOPIC.

For those of you who don’t know, Hot Topic is a scary-looking store on the outside with lots of interesting things on the inside: Harry Potter, Frozen, Walking Dead, Disney Princesses, Adventure Time, music, earrings, magic, delight, etc.

The music in Hot Topic usually is overwhelmingly loud and as much as I love the merchandise, this place kills my SPD.

BUT AGAIN, I MARCHED OUT COMPLETELY UNTOUCHED. ANOTHER MIRACLE.

What’s happening??! I thought to myself. I should do MORE stuff!

So what did I do?

I GOT A PRETZEL AND SOME LEMONADE.

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I sat on a bench, enjoyed my salty pretzel and sweet lemonade. I chuckled at the funny array of people, myself included. I felt so blessed to be doing all of it. At the same time, I remained vigilant for my top enemy.

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I somehow managed to survive the encounter, so I kept going.

Through Hallmark, Macy’s, and the cheesy leather goods emporium, I frollicked like the very normal shopper that I was so desperately trying to be.

It was surreal; it was exciting; and dare I say, enjoyable?

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THE FINALE

One of my greatest foes in life has to be escalators. In fact, the very first post I made on this blog was about escalators. This is the level of seriousness I’m talking about here.

Due to my perfect record so far that day, in addition to my overwhelming desire to be a complete BEAST, I marched towards the great escalators, and then I stood before them as one would do if they were about to destroy their enemy.

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Escalator was all like:

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And I was all like:

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AND THEN I WAS LIKE:

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Then it was over.

No traumatic escalator experience. I mean, I held on for dear life and looked so awkward that I could’ve out-awkwarded anyone in a 10 mile radius. BUT WHO CARES….I DID IT.

While it wasn’t a perfect time at the mall, it also wasn’t a complete disaster. More importantly, I went ALONE. I had nobody to fall back on if necessary, but I did it anyway. The successfulness of this day was in the very fact that I conquered my anxieties by going to the mall by myself while experiencing anxiety, and being ok with the unease.

I’m not sure why the sensory gods blessed me with a nice trip to the mall, but they did. I left on Cloud 9, wherever that is. Probably near here:

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xo kelly

Also, I was only there for about 2 hours. This post makes it sound like I was there for 10 hours. Just wanted to let you all know…I’m pretty beast, but I’m not 10 hours beast.

 

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World’s Best Coper

To cope.

According to the dictionary, the word cope generally means to successfully deal with or handle something that is difficult. Another dictionary refers to it as overcoming problems and difficulties.

While I’m not sure how successful I am, I’ve developed decent ways of coping with my severe sensory problems. I am a good coper…sometimes.

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People cope in their own way. People with sensory problems like myself have to resort to coping in strange ways. Let’s explore some of those ways in which people with sensory problems cope:

1. DEEP PRESSURE

Those of us with wacky sensory junk have a strange affliction for the sensation of touch. We hate it. We love it. If you’re like me, you can’t stand light touches, but love deep pressure. To fulfill my need for sensory stability, I need a buddy. Usually my sister, the helpless victim to my needs:

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Ahh, sisterly bonding at its finest.

2. WALKING/RUNNING

Another great way to soothe sensory-related anxiety is to go for a walk or run. The feeling of your feet on the ground can be very stabilizing. But be careful, sometimes walking when overstimulated can leave you dizzy and freaky-looking (see my post about turning into a T-REX).

As I was saying, walking and running can be great.

Unless you are a weirdo like me, and since toddlerhood have been pacing for hours in confined spaces, like a bathroom.

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INITIATE LAUNCH SEQUENCE. TURBO ENGINES….GOOO!

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Fun Fact: I still do this all the time. Also, I’m still single. AMAZING, I know.

3. ROCKING CHAIR-ING

On the 8th day, God made the rocking chair, so people with sensory problems can experience its glory and power. That day, praises for the chair were sung by all the angels…..all five of them. They sang really loud to compensate for the lack of angels:

angel rocker

The rocking chair and I fell in deep, disgusting love. Cheesy one-liners starting appearing:

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The movement of being in a rocking chair is so wonderful – so calming to my sensory system – I feel as if I’m being transported through space, through time even! It’s like the twilight zone, except, it’s not. It’s just me in a chair.

space rocker

Then something like this happens:

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4. BICYCLE RIDING

So this one may not be for everyone. But this works for me….and this is my blog. So there.

I very much enjoy bike riding. The combo of using my legs to push the pedals and using my arms to hold and steer myself provides great relief when I’m overstimulated. I would ride my bike more often, except I live in a fairly rural area of New York. I can’t ride without fear of this happening:

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5. BRUSHING

I’ve mentioned brushing in a previous post (Occupational Therapy Adventure). Sensory brushes are great as they provide deep pressure to numerous parts of the body. I like the consistency that brushing provides, and I also like that I can control it myself. What person with SPD doesn’t love control, AM I RIGHT?

The only strange part about using brushing to cope with sensory issues is that it can be rather odd to tell someone about. For instance:

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And that’s how the cookie crumbles. I have many other less boring but still strange ways of coping with my SPD, as I’m sure many of you do as well, but I’m going to end it here. Moral of today’s post: if a Hollister model dressed in a fancy suit wants to take you out for a nice dinner date, don’t tell him you have to brush yourself for 40 minutes (even if you DO). This has never happened to me, but when it does, I will be ready. I will be PRE-BRUSHED.

xo kelly