World’s Best Coper

To cope.

According to the dictionary, the word cope generally means to successfully deal with or handle something that is difficult. Another dictionary refers to it as overcoming problems and difficulties.

While I’m not sure how successful I am, I’ve developed decent ways of coping with my severe sensory problems. I am a good coper…sometimes.

Picture 46

People cope in their own way. People with sensory problems like myself have to resort to coping in strange ways. Let’s explore some of those ways in which people with sensory problems cope:

1. DEEP PRESSURE

Those of us with wacky sensory junk have a strange affliction for the sensation of touch. We hate it. We love it. If you’re like me, you can’t stand light touches, but love deep pressure. To fulfill my need for sensory stability, I need a buddy. Usually my sister, the helpless victim to my needs:

sitonme1

sitonme2

Ahh, sisterly bonding at its finest.

2. WALKING/RUNNING

Another great way to soothe sensory-related anxiety is to go for a walk or run. The feeling of your feet on the ground can be very stabilizing. But be careful, sometimes walking when overstimulated can leave you dizzy and freaky-looking (see my post about turning into a T-REX).

As I was saying, walking and running can be great.

Unless you are a weirdo like me, and since toddlerhood have been pacing for hours in confined spaces, like a bathroom.

pace right

pace left

INITIATE LAUNCH SEQUENCE. TURBO ENGINES….GOOO!

warpspeed

 

Fun Fact: I still do this all the time. Also, I’m still single. AMAZING, I know.

3. ROCKING CHAIR-ING

On the 8th day, God made the rocking chair, so people with sensory problems can experience its glory and power. That day, praises for the chair were sung by all the angels…..all five of them. They sang really loud to compensate for the lack of angels:

angel rocker

The rocking chair and I fell in deep, disgusting love. Cheesy one-liners starting appearing:

love rocker

The movement of being in a rocking chair is so wonderful – so calming to my sensory system – I feel as if I’m being transported through space, through time even! It’s like the twilight zone, except, it’s not. It’s just me in a chair.

space rocker

Then something like this happens:

special rocker

 

4. BICYCLE RIDING

So this one may not be for everyone. But this works for me….and this is my blog. So there.

I very much enjoy bike riding. The combo of using my legs to push the pedals and using my arms to hold and steer myself provides great relief when I’m overstimulated. I would ride my bike more often, except I live in a fairly rural area of New York. I can’t ride without fear of this happening:

Picture 55

 

5. BRUSHING

I’ve mentioned brushing in a previous post (Occupational Therapy Adventure). Sensory brushes are great as they provide deep pressure to numerous parts of the body. I like the consistency that brushing provides, and I also like that I can control it myself. What person with SPD doesn’t love control, AM I RIGHT?

The only strange part about using brushing to cope with sensory issues is that it can be rather odd to tell someone about. For instance:

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Picture 45

Picture 46

Picture 48

Picture 50

 

And that’s how the cookie crumbles. I have many other less boring but still strange ways of coping with my SPD, as I’m sure many of you do as well, but I’m going to end it here. Moral of today’s post: if a Hollister model dressed in a fancy suit wants to take you out for a nice dinner date, don’t tell him you have to brush yourself for 40 minutes (even if you DO). This has never happened to me, but when it does, I will be ready. I will be PRE-BRUSHED.

xo kelly

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10 comments

  1. You are so cute ~ Kelly!
    Yes, be sure to get all your: brushing, cycling, rocking, and
    pacing done before the “hottie” in a suit gets to the door 🙂
    Best regards,
    Kerry 🙂

  2. I love cycling as well! I’ve noticed that my balance, proprioception, and gross motor control is actually BETTER on a bike than it is when just walking. I mean, I trip over air. But on a bike I manage to stay upright somehow.

    1. Maybe the bike has some sort of strange balancing power that your own body isn’t capable of because of sensory issues. And I trip over air, too, so don’t feel bad. Also, up stairs. Oh, good times.

    1. Hi! Thank you so much! By the way, Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight is a staple of my life – I’m so appreciative for your work on SPD.
      If you get a chance, check out my other posts, they are all about SPD, with a funny twist.
      -kelly

  3. Kelly, I am constantly laughing in the face of painful relating whilst I read your posts! Hysterical! And your talent is refreshing. I was in Westchester (Chappequa, Goldens Bridge) and the bears were incorrigible. Heading up to Buffalo soon – I hope the falls keep them away. Doug : )

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